Be Your Own Birder

Nonfiction Bird Books

Nonfiction, by definition, is based on truth, and there is a great deal of truthfulness in these nonfiction books about birds and birding. While not all nonfiction is strictly factual – this genre also incorporates opinions, interpretations, and other writing that may include a personal slant or bias – there is a great deal to learn about birds in these nonfiction books about birds. (New reviews will be posted often; check back for even more reading suggestions!)

Learn more about birds with a good book. - Photo by Sebastien Wiertz

Nonfiction Books

Click book titles or cover images for more detailed reviews.


Cat Wars

Cat Wars

Just how damaging are cats to birds, other wildlife, public health, and the environment as a whole? Historically, how have cats evolved and spread as an invasive species? How have they contributed to species’ extinctions, and what other factors are equally – if not even more – critical for wildlife diversity and survival? What impact do cats have today, and how can damaging impacts be mitigated? Cat Wars offers a relatively unbiased and thorough discussion of these and other issues, including possible solutions and how there needn’t be any war at all between cat lovers and bird lovers. Read more…


Why Do Bluebirds Hate Me?

Why Do Bluebirds Hate Me?

Have you ever had birding questions that you think are a bit too silly, too easy, or too outrageous to ask? This clever and quirky anthology of crazy questions has the answers! Based on years of personal birding experience and the questions of his readers and store patrons, Mike O’Connor has thoroughly researched and irreverently answered a wide range of avian inquiries, from backyard birding to bird history to foraging techniques to crazy birds from all over the world. With a clever and fun tone that doesn’t shy away from even the strangest birding questions, this book is one sure to be an enjoyable read for any birder. Read more…


The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill

The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill

Birders don’t usually expect to find parrots thriving in large urban centers, but San Francisco is home to one of the most famous feral flocks, beautifully and lovingly documented in The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill. While the book occasionally strays from discussing the parrots to the author’s somewhat bohemian spiritual journey, it does provide a personable and entertaining account of the feral parrots that are some of San Francisco’s most celebrated avian residents. Detailed insights into bird behavior, interactions, and emotions give readers and unprecedented connection to these birds and a new appreciation for feral flocks. Read more…